Steppin’ Out of Reality

steppin-out

bowler-up

 

The 7th Principle of Mass Media Scans is, A new mass media technology will initially borrow the content and imitate the conventions of the mass medium that is currently dominant in a society. As the technology advances, the new medium will consume the older medium, turning it into content.  This  principle and the media text produced in this manner is what is called Necro-Media. This post features some examples of Necro-Media. 

While exploring posts from fellow photography bloggers, I came across some tagged as Polamatic. The Polamatic app enables you to convert your phone shots into a retro aesthetic that turns the shot into a composition that has the features and qualities of an old Polaroid picture.  I have some experience producing the Polaroid look, and PaintShop Pro imaging software includes a simple Polaroid frame effect which allows for the creation of Polaroid Transfer effects.  As a challenge and an experiment, I used two shots I had taken at the local bowling alley, when my daughter was participating in the weekly Special Olympics bowling night.  I tried to emulate as closely as possible the frame & look produced by a Polamatic app.  It took a bit of time to create & modify the frames, and the viewer can judge for themselves these first attempts. 

Let’s now consider how this all fits in with the concept of Necro-Media.  To begin with, the app itself is such an example. The app allows the user to take digital photographs with their phone and turn them into digital representations of old Polaroid pictures. The Mass Media technology allows the user to imitate the codes and conventions of an earlier medium, Polaroid Photography.  What I attempted in my experiment was to use other software to imitate the app.  In one sense I was just doing the same thing as the app, so that is an example of the same type of Necro-Media.  In another way, I was applying the principle to the app itself, by trying to emulate the Polamatic app’s features, including the use of dirt/scratches/folds and colourful text font.  The final compositions are Necro-Media of Necro-Media. 

The Steppin’ Out title for the first composition, brought to mind the classic jazz/swing standard, Steppin’ Out With My Baby, composed by Irving Berlin in 1948 and first performed by Fred Astaire in the movie, Easter Parade.  I selected the 1993 video of Tony Bennet ‘s rendition  of the song.

The music video was very successful at the time of its release. Helping to bring Bennett to the attention of a much younger generation, it established him as an elder statesman of a passing generation of entertainers.  It formed a bridge bridge between very different times. We can see this video composition as both a homage to the past, and as an example of Necro-Media. 

The first obvious  component is the use of B&W to emulate the old classic Fred & Ginger  movie musicals of the 1930s.  The choice of wardrobe combines the Fred & Ginger style with elements of the contemporary look of when the video was released.  The choice of camera angles, distances and staging also plays homage to the past. The mix of the older tap dancer ( could not find his name ) and the younger contemporary black dancers widens the target audience, while acknowledging the past and visually reflecting how much has changed in both the American entertainment industry & society. 

As the technology advances, the new medium will consume the older medium, turning it into content. This is both figuratively and literally true in this video. Besides all the aesthetic imitation and use of codes and conventions, take note of what is included in the limited number of props.  Included were, the early phonograph with the horn amplifier, the large records, the microphones included both 1930s nightclub that Bennett walks up to begin singing and a close-up of a radio studio microphone.  The later goes with the old radio being tuned .  The other technological prop was the fan typical of the early movies as a symbol of emotional heat and cool music.  

Mass Media technology and the forms of media  it generates are constantly changing and adapting. New art forms are created and old one respond to the impact, some adapt while others disappear, still others become specialty forms of art and communication.  The recent changes in the WordPress Reader demonstrate this, but that is for another post.  So now I will conclude & post this analysis; let’s  see  how it looks on the Reader. 

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Un tango à Paris and The Goat: Constructing a Reality

 Un tango à Paris — Maria Filali & Özgür Karahan

 

Mass Media constructs realities based on specific sets of codes and conventions determined by the nature of each Medium. The constructed reality of cinema derives from photography. Photography makes use of line, perspective, framing, light & shadow, camera angle and distance and in choice of monochrome or colour. Cinematography add motion, both the subject’s and that of camera’s. The nature of illusion of sequential motion that is created through film allows for editing of shots.

 

 

The Goat (1921) , a Buster Keaton two reeler ( A short silent film, of around twenty minutes running time. ),  plays with the construction of reality in multiple ways to create mistaken identity and confusion. Buster’s character is mistaken for the criminal because of a wrongly posted photograph. Mannequins are mistaken for people and a real Indian is mistaken for a cigar shop statue. Cuts and point of view alter the reality in this early Keaton classic.

The Goat 1921 - Buster Keaton

In Un tango à Paris, reality bends with colour and monochrome slipping  into a tango dance. Director Thomas Baspeyras,   admirably makes use of fades, perspectives, camera distance and angles to portray the transformation in time & place as the couple dances. With only two  GH3s cameras and assistant Marie Astier , he found editing the reality of the dancing challenging. Tangos are often improvised and lack of a specific choreographed  piece and this challenged creating a sense of continuity when editing.

 

 

Dancers (Links) : Maria Filali  and Özgür Karahan

 

 

Advertising Hunger: Values, Beliefs & Ideology

hungergamesposter

 

Jennifer Lawrence disappears in a constructed  reality of marketing  the latest Hunger Games movie. It has been reported in Variety that “ a handful of cities across the Jewish State have cut Lawrence herself out of the film’s posters ”.

 

Israel Mockingjay Posters

In the ultra-Orthodox suburb of Bnei Brak, as well as in the city Jerusalem – where several neighborhoods are heavily religious – only a censored version of the poster, featuring the image of the fiery crown is being displayed. Extreme adherents to Judaism  consider any display of the  female image to be immoral. Ultra-orthodox newspapers and catalogues commonly remove images of females from any images.

While this segment of the population is not the intended target audience for the movie, any advertisements in public space which is frequented by this group risks creating an offence to their cultural views.  Since more militant/aggressive members of the group are known to vandalize images that depict women,  it becomes necessary to be proactive in posting advertising.

Now, in some parts of the world,  the news reports of such public attacks of movie posters would be seen as valuable publicity, in Israel such news reports produce a negative image of the country. So by modifying the advertisements, public behaviour itself is modified.  This in turn constructs a reality that portrays Israel in a different light.  Unfortunately, in this instance the significance of the movie and its female lead makes the altered poster news-worthy and as a consequence, the event creates much the same negative impact as would reports of vandalized posters. Some would see this as worse, since the self-censoring could be interpretation of capitulating to an extreme element of the Israeli population, rather than defying them and treating the vandalization  as a criminal act.

 

Avengers Age of Ultron – Start Happy

Avenger Age of Ultron - Start HappySpotted this juxtaposition of product display in a Sudbury Walmart earlier in April. Stores will spend  time planning and organizing displays to influence shoppers in what they purchase. Impulse buying may appear random, but marketers often set up a emotional sequence that not only catches the eye, but also the desires and appeals attached to the shopper’s  values, beliefs and ideology.

Perhaps this display was accidental. It may have been some worker’s little joke,….. then again humour can sell a product or service.