Nike Makes Their Marketing Great Again ?

Nike’s Kaepernick tagline: “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.”

The recent Nike advertisement makes effective use of appeals based on values & beliefs. Emphasis is placed on the higher needs presented in Maslow’s Hierarchy The marketing strategy acknowledges that the demographic shift within the American population means that at the end of the day, more will support & agree with the message they are conveying with their brand.

 

Americus Reed, professor of Marketing at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, present an concise explanation for Nike’s marketing strategy as it applies to Identity loyalty ( when buying is being. Some brands, products, services and even organizations can transcend what they do to become a part of who you are) .

Full article , Nike notched a marketing checkmate with Kaepernick choice  was published by The Hill.  The advertisement makes effective use of appeals based on values & beliefs. The marketing strategy acknowledges that the demographic shift within the American population means that at the end of the day, more will support & agree with the message they are conveying with their brand. Included below are some key points from Professor Reed’s analysis.

  • Identity loyalty will create a buffer, a defence mechanism that protects the brand. The hardcore identity loyal Nike consumers will rally around each other and fiercely defend their community.

 

  • Nike also knows that one of the greatest things a brand can do is tie its own identity to the identity of iconic athletes as a way of creating that “aspirational self” — that image and thought that, “If I have this product, I can reinforce an important part of who I am.”

 

  • There is a sense of vicariously connecting one’s own identity to that of the brand and the iconic athlete that is a part of that brand. Again, it is all about identity and creating emotions through identity, whereby the product is the self-expressive conduit that symbolizes those values to yourself and others around you.

 

 

 

 

 

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When marketing context goes wrong ?

One of the problems faced with marketing using the digital text of current Mass Media, is how to effectively place your advertisement. Some marketers try and cheat by placing  advertisement into Social Media comments & links. The dueling Komodo dragons  connection to lady’s clothing seems  surreal and possibly inventive; unfortunately, the context was created by a sneak-placement on the National Geographic Twitter page.

The actual Twitter post was , Photo of the Day – Dueling Komodo dragons, January 30 .

The third comment was from a clothing advertisement for women. There was no attempt to create context with some comment on the photograph.

 

The consequence is that the viewer must create their own interpretation and association. They may ignore the advertisement or snark about it and perhaps create a ironic context.  There is a risk for the marketer that a comment could go viral and undermine the marketer & the product. Obviously, the marketer hopes that enough viewer will be curious enough to check out the Twitter page. The long shot that a viral reaction to the ad placement, even a negative one, could also potentially bring in a few customers. 

So did this marketing context go wrong or not ? On a superficial level, it may have  created a ridiculous surreal association in the minds of some viewers. If this association is something the viewer conscious of, then chances are that this will, at best, put the product line in a comical context. If the association is more glancing and barely acknowledged, then there is now way of knowing dueling Komodo dragons will encourage to purchase  a lady’s jumpsuit.

 

 

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