Toronto teen uses app to give visually-impaired a new look at the world | Toronto Star

Mass Media technology creates opportunities and can fill social needs  when appropriate problem solving is applied to daily living conditions to the whole  range of society.

Anmol Tukrel, a 17-year-old grade 12 student at Holy Trinity School in Richmond Hill, has created an app that helps visually impaired people identify objects and text. Tukrel’s free iPhone app, iDentifi, allows users to take a photo of virtually any object, and then describes that item in great detail back to the user. People can also take photos of text and have it read back to them, in one of 27 languages. Tukrel hopes it makes every day tasks — like picking out the can of pop you want — easier for people who are visually impaired.

Source: Toronto teen uses app to give visually-impaired a new look at the world | Toronto Star

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Picture this: Construction site break-in suspect sought in Calgary – CBC News

In the age of digital devices and online mass media, we are all potential content . In the past the old television show, Candid Camera, was the forerunner of prankster television. In a past that is not that distant, only television production companies could incorporate everyday  people into a constructed reality of news, documentaries, or prankster skits.

 

 

 

Now law biding citizens and law breakers must be prepared to be observed by security cameras, cell-phones and an assortment of digital devices.  A break-in suspect in Calgary Alberta, may be contemplating this social reality at this very moment.

 

New Reality -break-and-enter-calgary-cctv

Calgary police want the public’s help identifying a break-in suspect who appears to realize just a split-second too late that he’s on CCTV.

Source: Construction site break-in suspect sought by Calgary police – Calgary – CBC News

Toronto is One Big Lazy Susan: Advice & Tips for Refugees

Vinay Menone, Toronto Star arts and life columnist & feature writer, offers observations on adapting to Canadian society and the specific advantages offered in Toronto.

This is a world-class city with great prospects. All you need to do is work hard and follow the rules. Don’t worry, you will — nothing elevates a human more than a second chance at life, especially when the first one was snatched away rather than squandered. When you gaze up at the CN Tower, think of it as pointing at the cosmos and the infinite possibilities now within your reach.

 

He points out the  range of food  as an example of how cultural touchstones are always near.

 

The good news: not much needs to change with your diet. Toronto is one big Lazy Susan, upon which all of the world’s spices and regional dishes are just a few twirls away. Kibbeh, tabbouleh, shawarma, mujaddara, you name it and someone is selling it. Or they are preparing it in restaurants such as Byblos, Tabule and Takht-e Tavoos. 

 

It is his observations on mass media popular culture that are of  particular interest. Menon provides the insight on how to navigate the flood of Mass Media influences and recognizes that it has value , while also being a continuum of styles, content and messages, “I’m not suggesting Star Wars or Miley Cyrus are equivalent to Shakespeare or Mozart” . He identifies the wide range of possibilities available to widening and sharing in community experience. from opera and live theatre to the the AGO, ROM, Science Centre, Ripley’s Aquarium and Toronto Zoo.

If you have children, don’t be alarmed by how popular culture shapes their interests. Music, movies, fashion, games, TV, books, these diversions only thrive in places of imagination and harmony. This is why religious extremists, like the ones you are fleeing, are so eager to impose barbaric laws that govern daily life.

“Art is a path to enlightenment.

It is the enemy of totalitarianism.”

 Vinay Menone, Toronto Star

 

 

 

Sudbury photo blogger aims to highlight need for cycling infrastructure – Sudbury – CBC News

Sudbury photo blogger, Matt Alexander, is using photo manipulation and social media to highlight the lack of cycling infrastructure within this Northern Ontario city of  over 160,000. Mass Media constructs reality and contains values, beliefs and ideologies. By presenting  over a hundred images of cyclists with their bicycles removed Alexander hopes to use humour and  strong visual images to create a dialogue about the lack of infrastructure for this mode of transportation in the city of  Sudbury. 

Statistics  indicate a low use of bikes by workers in the city, but then lack of infrastructure impedes or restricts their efficiency.  No mention is made in the online  article of students in either  post secondary  institutions or youth.

Click the above  images to visit Invisible Bike Lanes of Sudbury. Check the link below to listen to the full Radio interview on Morning North.

 

Source: Sudbury photo blogger aims to highlight need for cycling infrastructure – Sudbury – CBC News