AIDA-Magazine Covers – What do they have in common ?

 

 

 

 

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Is Pizza are All Right ? – American brands negotiating fractured culture

Tiki Brand got an unwelcome association with the white nationalist movement in August when neo-Nazis and their allies carried Tiki torches in a nigh-time march in Charlottesville . In response they posted a public statement disavowing any connection the extremist views of the far right .

TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and are deeply saddened and disappointed. We do not support their message or the use of our products in this way. Our products are designed to enhance backyard gatherings and to help family and friends connect with each other at home in their yard.

 

A new problem has emerged in marketing in the polarizing political environment in the United States of America – various far right groups are seeking cultural normalization by associating themselves with a variety of American products & brands. Tiki Brand garnered unwelcome association with neo-Nazi activity, while Papa John’s pizza chain  when its chief executive’s Nov. 1 call with investors, in which he blamed disappointing pizza sales on football players’ protests against racism and police brutality (Source).

 As the marketplace becomes the latest battleground in the culture wars, brand strategists are advising companies accustomed to staying out of the political fray to proactively weigh in with bold statements about race — as Nike and Ben & Jerry’s have done — to thwart attempts by hate groups to adopt brands as their own.

 

More brands are also building up their crisis management teams in preparation for the next racial flare-up, said Tiffany R. Warren, senior vice president and chief diversity officer at Omnicom Group, a global marketing and corporate communications holding company. (Washington Post Nov 16 – )

 

 

Keeping in mind the basic Mass Media Principles of Business Interests, Target Audiences, and embedded Values, Ideologies & Beliefs, it is easy to see that in the shifting demographics and polarizing cultural changes of American society, maintaining a viable brand becomes more and more difficult. Social action and public expression of a set of wide inclusive  values & beliefs will become a necessity to prevent a brand & company from being isolated from the larger population and their buying strength .

“That’s what you mean, eh?”

Canadians Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis created the Canadian quintessential cultural touch-stones, The Mckenzie Brothers, for SCTV (1980).  Created originally as filler to both satisfy and mock network Canadian content demands, the duo became a pop culture phenomenon in both Canada and the United States. Though initially intended for Canadian TV only, some of the two-minute “Great White North” segments would find their way into U.S. versions of the 30-minute shows due to a shortage of content that week. When NBC ordered the 90-minute shows for the 1981 season, they specifically cited good affiliate feedback on the “two dumb Canadian characters” and requested that the characters be included in every program.

One of the characteristics of the pair was their exaggerated Canadian  dialect, made up of a mixture of  Ottawa Valley and Toronto dialects.  It incorporated real and imagined idiom ( Hoser – false etymology ) to satirize the expectations of Canadian culture &  image. The most famous expression is the ubiquitous “eh”.

“And we thought if we’re going to do these characters, we’re going to slow down our speech a little, certain words we’re going to over-pronounce and we’re going to tag a lot of sentences with ‘eh.’ ” – Dave Thomas

 

For an more expansive article on this topic see Toronto Star-So you’ve heard all about this Canadian myth, eh?

 

Cultural Appropriation : Jesse Wente’s Response

 

Jesse Wente has appeared on CBC Radio’s Metro Morning as film and pop culture critic for 20 years and currently serves as Director of Film Programmes, at TIFF Bell Lightbox, overseeing theatrical, Cinematheque and Film Circuit programming. A self-described ‘Ojibwe dude’ with a national and international lens, he encourages audiences to consider diversity and inclusion into the future view of their organization, industry and country.

Well known as a film critic and broadcaster in Toronto and across Canada, Jesse was the first nationally syndicated Indigenous columnist for the CBC, covering film and pop culture for 20 local CBC Radio programs. He has also been a regular guest on CBC Newsworld’s News Morning and Weekend Edition, as well as Q.

 

Jesse Wente is a leading film critic and programmer of Indigenous cinema

 

Jesse is Ojibwe, and his family comes from Chicago and the Serpent River First Nation in Ontario. He is an advocate for Aboriginal Arts, most notably on screen. He draws attention to the imagery used by Hollywood in portrayals of indigenous peoples and stresses the need for a culture to have influence on their own depiction. His pieces on The Revenant, Beyonce and sports mascots were among the most shared on CBC.ca .  SOURCE: National Speakers Bureau

 

An editorial introducing the concept of an “appropriation prize” for the author who can best embody the cultural experience of a minority group in Canada comes off as an attempt to steal one of the few things Indigenous people in Canada have left — their story, according to one Indigenous author.

“We’ve lost our land, we’ve lost our languages and almost the last thing we have left are our stories and our voices,” said D.A. Lockhart, a member of the Moravian of the Thames First Nation in Chatham-Kent.

“To have somebody come in and say we’ll tell those better than you … is sort of a painful kick while you’re already down.”  SOURCE:  Appropriation Prize Controversy an Opportunity for Learning CBC NEWS

Mass Media consumes Mass Media, turning other forms of Mass Media into content  and incorporating/emulating  other Media’s Codes & Conventions.  In this process, appropriation of topics, subject matter and other aspects of content will be distorted intentionally & unintentionally through the Values, Beliefs & Ideologies of those delivering the Mass Media Text/Message. It becomes very easy for Mass Media creators & producers to appropriate a culture other than their own  through adoption & adaptation; we are only confronting the past and potential damage that this creates when a cultural group is overwhelmed by a more powerful (politically/economically) cultural group.  The question of who controls the narrative and to what purpose becomes a significant part of Mass Media, Media Literacy, and society at large.